Contacts

Office: Encina Hall, Suite 10
Mail Code: 94305-6055
Phone: 650.498.9583
Email: internationalpolicy@stanford.edu
Web Site: https://fsi.stanford.edu/masters-degree

Courses offered by the Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy are listed under the subject code INTLPOL on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Mission

The Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy (MIP), is an interdisciplinary program devoted to rigorous analysis of international policy issues in diplomacy, governance, cyber and international security, global health, and environmental policy. The program is designed to integrate perspectives from political science, law, economics, history, and other disciplines, while also incorporating research opportunities and a focus on implementation and administration of solutions addressing global problems. The MIP program combines a scholarly focus with practical training designed to prepare students for careers in public service and other settings where they can have an impact on international issues.

The program allows students to specialize in cyber policy and security; energy, natural resources, and the environment; governance and development; or international security. Each of the four areas of specialization is guided by one -or more- major research centers at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. This collaboration provides MIP students with exposure to cutting-edge research on global policy issues. Established in 1982, the program was endowed as the Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies (IPS) in 2007.

University requirements for the M.A. degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. 

Admission

To apply, or for information on graduate admission, see the Office of Graduate Admissions website. Applications for admission in Autumn Quarter must be filed with supporting credentials by 11:59 pm PST on Tuesday, January 11, 2022. 

Applicants who intend to apply to the Knight-Hennessy Scholars (KHS) program must submit two applications: 1) KHS application with deadline of 1:00pm PDT on October 6, 2021; and 2) MIP application with deadline of 11:59 pm PST on December 1, 2021. Note: this earlier MIP application deadline is only for applicants to KHS.

Prerequisite Course Work

The MIP program has a quantitatively rigorous core curriculum and requires University-level courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics taken either as part of a student's undergraduate or graduate education, at another accredited educational institution, or through an approved online course. In addition, while not required, the program strongly encourages applicants to complete an introductory course in statistics. An understanding of calculus may also be useful in preparation for the Research Methods course sequence. For details on the content each prerequisite course should cover, see Frequently Asked Questions on the MIP website. All prerequisite courses must be completed prior to the start of classes in late September; however, they do not need to be completed at the time of application.

Application Materials

Applicants must submit the following materials as part of the web-based application:

  • Statement of purpose on relevant personal, academic, and career plans and goals (2 pages, single-spaced)

  • Official Transcripts

    • Upload official transcripts for any institution attended for one year or longer

    • Admitted applicants who accept the offer of admission will be required to submit final official transcripts (paper or e-transcript). See Graduate Admissions for details.

  • Three letters of recommendation

    • Please submit recommendations from academic and professional contacts who can effectively speak to your academic skills and/or professional experience, as well as your preparedness for graduate study

  • Academic writing sample (written in English, 7-15 pages in length, and double-spaced)

  • Resume or curriculum vitae

  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required of MIP applicants for matriculation in Autumn Quarter 2022. Therefore, GRE scores will not be considered for applicants who are able to submit them.

    • Stanford University code for ETS is 4704.

  • TOEFL scores (only required of applicants who are non-native English speakers and who did not attend undergraduate institutions where English is the language of instruction; please see Graduate Admissions for additional information)

Applicants are expected to have a four-year bachelor’s degree from an accredited school. International applicants should review the International Academic Credentials page to determine eligibility to apply.

Applicants should plan to review the Admissions section of the MIP website as well as the Frequently Asked Questions.

Faculty

Director of Graduate Studies:

Francis Fukuyama (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Associate Director:

Chonira Aturupane (International Policy)

Executive Committee:

Marshall Burke (Earth System Science)

Andrew Grotto (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Michael McFaul (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; Political Science)

Kathryn Stoner (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Affiliated Faculty:

Anat Admati (Graduate School of Business)

Michele Barry (Medicine)

Jayanta Battacharya (Medicine)

Coit D. Blacker (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (Emeritus))

Lisa Blaydes (Political Science)

Dan Boneh (Computer Science; Electrical Engineering)

Paul Brest (Law)

David Cohen (Center for Human Rights and International Justice)

Martha Crenshaw (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (Emeritus))

Larry Diamond (Hoover Institution)

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Pascaline Dupas (Economics)

Karen Eggleston (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Donald Emmerson (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (Emeritus))

Rodney Ewing (Geological and Environmental Sciences)

Marcel Fafchamps (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

James Fearon (Political Science)

Anna Grzymala-Busse (Political Science)

Garbielle Hecht (History)

Siegfried Hecker (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (Emeritus))

David Holloway (History (Emeritus))

Erik Jensen (Law)

Saumitra Jha (Graduate School of Business)

Tsutsui Kiyoteru (Sociology)

David Lobell (Earth System Science)

Prashant Loyalka (School of Education)

Steve Luby (Medicine)

Stephen Krasner (Political Science)

Beatriz Magaloni (Political Science)

Jennifer Martinez (Law)

Abbas Milani (Iranian Studies)

Grant Miller (School of Medicine)

Norman Naimark (History)

Rosamond Naylor (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Jean Oi (Political Science)

Doug Owens (School of Medicine)

Jennifer Pan (Communications)

William J. Perry (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (Emeritus))

Nathaniel Persily (Law)

Condoleezza Rice (Hoover Institution)

Scott Rozelle (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Scott Sagan (Political Science)

Gi-Wook Shin (Sociology)

Stephen J. Stedman (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Florencia Torche (Sociology)

Andrew Walder (Sociology)

Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science)

Keith Winstein (Computer Science)

Paul Wise (Pediatrics)

Frank Wolak (Economics)

Zhou Xueguang (Sociology)

Amy Zegart (Hoover Institution)

Adjunct Professors:

Thomas Fingar (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Steve Pifer (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Lecturers, Academic Staff, Scholars, and Fellows:

Steve Blank (Management Science and Engineering)

Dikla Carmel-Hurwitz (Graduate School of Business)

Leslie Chin (Graduate School of Business)

Christophe Crombez (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Eileen Donahoe (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Paul Edwards (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Gregory Falco (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Joseph Felter (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Miriam González Durántez (Law)

Rose Gottemoeller (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Shelby Grossman (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Rosanna Guadagno (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Medi-Jalalddin Hakimi (Law)

Amr Hamzawy (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Jerry Kaplan (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Kenji Kushida (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Herb Lin (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Anja Manuel (International Policy)

Oriana Mastro (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Scott McKeon (Economics)

H.R. McMaster (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Dinsha Mistree (Law)

Jamie O'Connell (Law)

Megan Palmer (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Riana Pfefferkorn (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Marietje Schaake (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Alain Schläpfer (Political Science)

Daniel Sneider (Center for East Asian Studies)

Julia Spiegel (International Policy)

Alex Stamos (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Mark Thurber (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Harold Trinkunas (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Allen Weiner (Law)

Steve Weinstein (Management Science & Engineering)

Graduate Advising Expectations

International Policy (MIP) is committed to providing academic advising in support of graduate student scholarly and professional development. When most effective, this advising relationship entails collaborative and sustained engagement by both the adviser and the advisee. As a best practice, advising expectations should be periodically discussed and reviewed to ensure mutual understanding. Both the adviser and the advisee are expected to maintain professionalism and integrity. Graduate students are active contributors to the advising relationship, proactively seeking academic and professional guidance and taking responsibility for informing themselves of policies and degree requirements for their graduate program.

Each student in the MIP program is assigned a faculty adviser as well as a program adviser and a career adviser. The faculty adviser, who is assigned in September of the student's first quarter of matriculation, is identified based on a student's interests and area of specialization. The expectation is that students meet with their faculty advisers on a quarterly basis, at minimum. Please note that it is the student's responsibility to schedule the advising meetings. In addition to the faculty adviser, the program adviser (i.e., MIP Assistant Director for Academic and Student Services) advises all students in the program by providing guidance and support on degree requirements and progress, academic policy interpretation and enforcement, degree program support, personal support, and other matters as needed. The career adviser (i.e., MIP Career Services and Alumni Affairs Manager) provides support on internships, careers, and professional development.

To expand, faculty advisers guide students in key areas such as exploring academic opportunities and professional pathways, understanding and interpreting the university ecosystem, and identifying ways to pursue one's interests at Stanford. MIP students should view the faculty adviser as an entry point to their interests, and they are actively encouraged to meet broadly with other faculty as well. 

Academic progress and student completion of program requirements and milestones are monitored by MIP Assistant Director for Academic and Student Affairs. MIP students (including coterminal, dual, and joint degree students) are required to submit a program proposal to the department during spring quarter of their first year of enrollment in the program. This time frame is different from general University policy. The program proposal, which is a formal milestone, establishes a student's individual program of study to meet University and department degree requirements. Students are also required to submit a second program proposal no later than the quarter in which they apply to graduate. This graduation program proposal is also a formal milestone that must be completed in order to graduate. The form is available on the MIP website. Additional information on the Master’s Program Proposal is available in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin.

Additionally, the program adheres to the advising guidelines and responsibilities listed by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education (VPGE) and in the Graduate Academic Policies (GAP).