Contacts

Office: Building 260, Room 119
Mail Code: 94305-2014
Phone: (650) 723-4977
Email: ilac@stanford.edu
Web Site: Iberian and Latin American Cultures at Stanford

Courses offered by the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, formerly the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, are listed under the subject code ILAC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site. For courses in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish language instruction with the subject codes CATLANG, PORTLANG and SPANLANG, see the Language Center section of this bulletin.

The Language Center offers a series of second- and third-year courses designed for students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken (heritage speakers) and who wish to develop their existing linguistic strengths. See the "Language Center" section of this bulletin.

The department is a part of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Studying Iberian and Latin American cultures at Stanford means engaging in a deep and compelling exploration of the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America (including Brazil), and Latinx communities in the United States. To achieve the goal of training students as experts in these areas, the department balances an emphasis on literary studies with philosophical, historical, and social approaches to cultural issues. Given the focus on critical thinking, open discussion, and close textual analysis, undergraduate majors are provided excellent preparation for a large number of professional fields, including business, education, international relations, law, and medicine. The graduate program provides rigorous and highly individualized advanced training in the analysis of Iberian, Latin American (including Brazil), and Latinx literatures, and students go on to produce innovative original research and find excellent jobs, both in academe and beyond.

Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

In this major, students engage in a thoroughly transnational and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American (including Brazil) literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with a focus on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

This undergraduate program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the Spanish language in a global perspective.

Faculty in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Director: Héctor Hoyos

Chair of Graduate Studies: Héctor Hoyos

Chair of Undergraduate Studies: Vincent Barletta

Professor: Joan Ramon Resina (also Comparative Literature)

Associate Professors: Vincent Barletta (also Comparative Literature), Héctor Hoyos, Lisa Surwillo

Assistant Professor: Nicole Hughes

Lecturers: Ximena Briceño, , Allison Kendra (Dean’s Fellow)

Courtesy Professors: Zephyr Frank, Roland Greene, Paula Moya, José David Saldívar, Ramón Saldívar

Emeriti: (Professors) Bernard Gicovate, María-Paz Haro, Mary Pratt, Jorge Ruffinelli, Sylvia Wynter, Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano; (Professor, Teaching)

Graduate Advising Expectations

The Department of Iberian and Latin American Studies is committed to providing academic advising in support of graduate student scholarly and professional development. The overall goal of advising, both in the DLCL and the department, is to help graduate students make academic and career choices wisely, and think ahead, in order to craft a long-term plan for their graduate student career and beyond. When most effective, the advising relationship entails collaborative and sustained engagement by both the adviser and the advisee. As a best practice, advising expectations should be periodically discussed and reviewed to ensure mutual understanding. Both the adviser and the advisee are expected to maintain professionalism and integrity. Advising is both an academically invaluable form for the transmission of expertise, as well as a key aspect of creating a strong departmental and Stanford community.

Faculty Advisers

Faculty advisers guide students in key areas such as selecting courses, designing and conducting research, developing of teaching pedagogy, navigating policies and degree requirements, and exploring academic opportunities and professional pathways.

  • Upon enrolling, students plan their work under the direction of the Chair of Graduate Studies or a faculty member designated by the program. When the student selects a more specialized adviser, the transition should involve oral or written communication between both advisers and the student concerning the student's progress, goals, and expectations. It is possible for doctoral students to choose two main advisers at the dissertation stage, provided all agree this is academically sound. 

  • Faculty advisers should meet with assigned students to discuss their selection of courses and to plan from a broader, longer-term perspective, including discussion of Program milestones and a basic timeline; an overview of Department and DLCL offerings beyond courses; student goals and interests and DLCL or Stanford programs that may be relevant; and (for doctoral students) how to transfer previous graduate coursework.

  • Faculty advisers and graduate students should meet at least once per quarter to assess the advisee's course of study, performance over the past quarter, and plans for the next quarter, as well as longer term plans. If a student has two advisers, the student should meet at least once per quarter with each adviser and at least once per year with both advisers at the same time. 

  • For doctoral students, faculty should help their advisees plan for exams, research grant applications, develop research projects, and plan ahead for both the academic job market and the job search beyond academia.

  • Faculty advisers should provide feedback about the student's progress to the department during the Annual Review process. For more information about the Annual Review, see the Graduate Handbook.

Graduate Students

Graduate students are active contributors to the advising relationship, proactively seeking academic and professional guidance and taking responsibility for informing themselves of policies and degree requirements for their graduate program.

  • Upon enrolling, students plan their work under the direction of the Chair of Graduate Studies or a faculty member designated by the program. As the student develops a field of expertise, the student chooses a program adviser to replace the Chair of Graduate Studies role. The transition should involve oral or written communication between both advisers and the student concerning the student's progress, goals, and expectations. 

  • Graduate students and faculty advisers and should meet at least once per quarter to assess the advisee's course of study, performance over the past quarter, and plans for the next quarter, as well as longer term plans. If a student has two advisers, the student should meet at least once per quarter with each adviser and at least once per year with both advisers at the same time. 

  • Students should consult with their advisers on all academic matters, including coursework, conference presentations and publications, research travel, and teaching plans. 

  • Students should provide a thorough self-evaluation each year for the annual review. For more information about the annual review, see the Graduate Handbook.

For a statement of University policy on graduate advising, see the Graduate Advising section of this bulletin.